You receive a notice that you have won a large prize in a lottery that email address you never entered. To claim the prize you must pay a fee and provide some personal identity information. Of course! It's another scheme to steal your money. A survey identifies that you have a certain medical condition that can only be cured if your email address buys a certain medicine from a certain website. This is the only place in the whole world that you can obtain email address medicine. Of course, it's a miracle cure, but no guarantees!

You are requested to go to a screen and update your personal banking email address details, otherwise, your bank will freeze your account! If you pass your mouse over the link you will see that it does not go to your bank, or to any bank. It will go to a website where you are able to give up your identity so that they can steal from your bank account. Most real banks warn that they never ask customers to log in via email. This generic heading covers letters from email addresses anywhere in the world with the common theme that a share in a large sum of money, which the sender wishes to move secretly out of a country, is offered to the recipient in return for some personal identity details and the payment of some fees. These came to the notice of authorities in the 1960s when letters produced on old typewriters were email addresses received from Nigeria. The reasons for the offers differed and were quite creative, but the method was always the same.

Surprisingly, these schemes trapped numbers of naive email address people then and have continued trapping people for almost fifty years, now by email. There's a potential victim born every day. Scams are designed to appeal to some human traits - greed, fear, ego, etc. Scams have always been around. The internet just email addresses enables them to reach more people faster. Remember, if it looks too good to be true, it probably is! Use common sense. Get independent email address advice. Only give personal identity or credit card information to parties you know and trust. Scams will continue as long as there are naive people.